ACIDITY IN WINE

ALL WINE IS ACIDIC.

It doesn’t matter where its made or what variety was used, if it’s a wine, it is going to be acidic. All wines have a pH level lower than 7.0, and most are around 3.0 to 4.0. Acid is one of wine’s core components, along with alcohol, tannins and sugar/sweetness. Check out our glossary for more information.

BUT SOME WINES ARE MORE ACIDIC THAN OTHERS

Wines from cooler climates tend to be more acidic than wines from warmer climates, so a Tasmanian Pinot Noir is likely to have more acidity than a Barossa Shiraz. White wines tend to be more acidic than red wines, though whites that have undergone Malo-lactic fermentation, such as oaky and buttery chardonnays will have a higher pH (ie be less acidic) then those that haven’t (like Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc).

ACIDITY AND ALCOHOL

Grapes are at their most acidic right before they start to ripen, after which the sugary content rises and acid levels begin the fall. The riper the grape, the lower the acid and the higher the sugar. This is why wines made in cool climates tend to be more acidic – the grapes aren’t able to ripen to the same extent as those grown in warmer regions. Now, during the winemaking process, yeasts metabolise sugar and turn it into alcohol, so the higher the sugar content in the grape, the higher the potential alcohol in the wine. So wines with higher acidity tend to be lower in alcohol than wines with lower acidity.

WINES WITH HIGHER ACIDITY TO TRY:

Riesling
Semillon
Champagne (or Tasmanian Sparkling)

WINES WITH LOWER ACIDITY TO TRY

Shiraz (especially from warmer climates like Barossa)
Cabernet Sauvignon
Grenache

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